Fred and Jean's Travel Photos

2005 - Hannibal, Missouri, page 2

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Mark Twain Cave - Post Office
Mark Twain Cave - Post Office
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Jesse James Gang Hangout After a Robbery
Jesse James Gang Hangout After a Robbery
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It is believed by many that Jesse James and his gang hung out for a while in the cave after committing a robbery (see photo on the left above). We know it is true that he did enter the cave at least once; he left his autograph on one of the rocks, which has been authenticated by a graphologist.

Through exploring the cave together, Tom and Becky found and used an area where they left letters for each other. This place became known as the Post Office, and is shown in the photo on the right above. (To see more photos of the cave, visit the official Mark Twain Cave web site.)

Another well-known site in downtown Hannibal is Cardiff Hill, at the bottom of which is a brass statue of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, and at the top is the Mark Twain Memorial Lighthouse, the farthest inland lighthouse in the world. As we stood at the bottom of Cardiff Hill, we were unaware that there was an alternative way to reach the lighthouse than by the 244 steps up the hill...driving up the back way! Well, the exercise was good for us, I guess!

Tom Sawyer & Huck Finn Statue - Cardiff Hill
Tom Sawyer & Huck Finn Statue - Cardiff Hill
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Mark Twain Memorial Lighthouse
Mark Twain Memorial Lighthouse
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The photo below left shows the Mark Twain Riverboat, built in 1964 in Dubuque, Iowa, cruising down the Mississippi River. We took this picture from our table on the balcony of Sawyer Creek's Restaurant where we ate twice. The food was quite good, and we enjoyed watching the river and the occasional train go by while we ate. The photo on the right of Fred and me was taken by our waitress.

Mark Twain Riverboat
Mark Twain Riverboat
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Fred and Jean at Sawyer's Creek Restaurant
Fred and Jean at Sawyer's Creek Restaurant
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We also visited "Molly" Brown's birthplace, a tiny, historic 16 x 30-foot house that was built into the side of a hill in Hannibal in the early 1860's.

The daughter of Irish immigrants, Molly was born Margaret Tobin on July 18, 1867. She married James Joseph (J.J.) Brown in 1886; she separated from her husband around 1909; and in April 1912, boarded the HMS Titanic on its fateful maiden voyage. In real life, she was never known by the nickname "Molly," but by Maggie.

After she and the other survivors were rescued, she immediately organized efforts to help the less fortunate, many of whom spoke no English and had lost everything. She managed to raise $10,000 from the first-class passengers before the ship reached New York!

Asked by reporters how she managed to survive the Titanic disaster, Maggie quipped "Typical Brown luck. We're unsinkable."

Later, after she became president of the Titanic survivor's committee, she became known as the "Unsinkable Molly Brown."

Birthplace of Molly Brown, Hannibal, MO
Birthplace of Molly Brown, Hannibal, MO
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Margaret was a socially active woman. She became involved in the women's suffrage movement; ran for Senate eight years before women even had the vote; and lead a relief group dedicated to the rebuilding efforts in France during World War I.

Margaret's real life bore little resemblance to the legend of "Molly" Brown, which was made famous after her death by Denver Post reporter Gene Fowler, and later, by Hollywood, with the musical, "The Unsinkable Molly Brown." To read more about her, the Encyclopedia Titanica offers a more historically accurate account of her life.

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